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BASS LAKE AREA TRAILS

There are a number of easily reached trails in the Bass Lake Area which offer a variety of experience and can be used to enhance your visit to the area. For all trails, bring lots of drinking water and wear appropriate hiking footwear. Most trails have easy to moderate slopes with a few having steep slopes. Plan to take your time and your camera! Please pack out all trash you pack in and stay on designated trails. Cutting across switchbacks causes erosion of soils and trail damage.


Willow Creek Trail & Angel Falls
One of the most challenging trails is the Willow Creek Trail (22E03) which can be reached either by the North Shore Road next to the Falls Day Use parking area or from the Willow Creek parking area off of Road 274. The trail is two and seven tenths miles long, ending at the McLeod Flat Road and offers moderate to steep climb. The main attractions of this trail are Angel Falls and Devils Slide, two breathtaking water falls, and a variety of quiet spots and scenic views along the way. Along with the spectacular waterfalls, Willow Creek presents dangers in its extremely slippery rocks and swirling pools. These can be deadly; many people have been injured and some have lost their lives. Please be careful and stay on the trail! About three tenths miles beyond the Devils Slide turnoff, the Chlkoot trail branches off to the east traveling further up Willow Creek.

Goat Mountain / Spring Cove Trails

On the south side of Bass Lake, Goat Mountain fire lookout is accessible via the Spring Cove Trail (22E18) and the Goat Mountain Trail (22E94). The Goat Mountain Trail begins in the Forks Campground and the Spring Cove Trail begins on the east side of the Spring Cove Campground entrance. It is about two and a half miles between the campgrounds. Both trails intersect in about an eighth of a mile, with another two and a half miles to the lookout. Both offer spectacular views of Bass Lake and mountains beyond. The walk is up hill, so plan for plenty of time and take plenty of water.

Way-of-the-Mono Interpretive Trail
Visitors curious about the first people to inhabit the area will want to visit the Way-of-the-Mono Interpretive Trail. This self-guided loop trail is about one half mile long, offering a spectacular vista point to view the lake and mountains. Signs
along the trail describe who the Mono people were and how they lived. The trailhead is located across from the Little Denver Church Day Use Area and has an ample parking area.

Browns Ditch Trail
This is not an official trail but it is very clear and easy to walk. Browns Ditch meets Hwy 274 at Central Camp Road. Hwy 274 is the main road along the North side of the Lake. Browns Ditch is cement Flume that brings additional water to the Lake. The trail runs along side of the Flume. The Flume is elevated in several areas so the you must walk on the steel walk way other the water. The trail is about 2.5 miles long. Water comes from Willow Creek. The Creek does not feed Bass Lake rather it runs just to the North East. Do not let the water invite you in. The fast current and steep walls make it very dangerous. The trail offers good views of the valley below Bass Lake. The Flume does dry out in June.

Bass Lake Dam
Learn about the dam and the trails that lead to it. Click here